Archive for the ‘Flash’ Category

Android And Flash – Can’t We Just Be Friends?

Friday, May 22nd, 2015

I never really expected to be somebody that you would call a tablet geek. I frankly thought that apples were probably going to be a waste of time and that the PC was still want to be king for a period of time. I think I was alone here, as there were quite a few experts that said the same thing.

I never really thought that I would be a tablet owner, but then I received one for Christmas from a friend of mine and I immediately took to it.

I can say that I am a gadget guy, and obviously the fact that I started with a high-end tablet like the Asus Transformer Infinity, meant that I would either sink or swim right away. There would be no opportunity for me to complain about the technology, or the lack of hardware power, because really this is one of the best tablets you can buy right now. What’s more, the fact that you can use a keyboard is a huge plus for me. I will say that the keyboard itself is a bit of a piece of junk, but it does provide battery life and actually makes this a usable device. Very usable, in fact; I use it for reading books and when I’m cooking in order to read recipes, as well as to play a lot of the games that are available. I certainly won’t be talking about the IPad, of course, but that’s because I never really had any time for Apple products because I feel as if they are a lot of hype and mostly junk.

flash-androidBut Android is actually a phenomenal ecosystem as far as programmers are concerned. As a user, I’ve always been very impressed with the fact that most Android software is actually either cheap or free. Those are two characteristics that make the platform very attractive for almost anyone. So it really was a surprise for me that Adobe stopped supporting Android when it comes to Flash. I understand that they already have a number of platforms that they are (more…)

Flash – The Origin

Tuesday, May 12th, 2015

(I’m not always a huge proponent of looking back, especially when it comes to computer programs and platforms, but this is an interesting classic article from Computer Shopper touting the “great strides” of the original Macromedia Flash. Here we are, some 15 years later, and it’s still kicking. Something you really can’t say about many languages of the tech bubble era…)

Increasingly, the most attractive way to publish your multimedia is via the Internet or a corporate intranet. It saves the cost of burning and distributing CDs; it lets you update the product on a continuous basis; and you can be sure of an audience as large as you want–global, if necessary. Because plain HTML delivers static content, however, developers are always on the lookout for “active Web” tools that paint motion and sound–in a word, multimedia–onto the Web.

There are a variety of ways to create active Web content, most of which involve plug-ins. The ruling plug-in is Macromedia’s Shockwave, which has quickly become a standard for multimedia playback on the Web. Like other multimedia formats, Shockwave’s player is distributed free for download.

As might be expected, Macromedia Director movies can be easily “shocked”; in fact, Director is one of the major products used to create Shockwave presentations. Unfortunately, Director 5 cannot save files in Shockwave format. Instead, you’ll need to visit the Macromedia Web site and download Afterburner for Director, which compresses your movie and saves it in Shockwave format. Director 6, which will have been released by press time, will include lots of (more…)

Flash Love – Nostalgia Time

Sunday, May 10th, 2015

I’ve always had a soft spot for Macromedia Flash. As one of the first members of the press to review the original version of the product, then called FutureSplash Animator 1.0, I feel as if I’ve watched it grow up.

Back in its infancy, when it was developed and marketed by a small company called FutureWave Software Inc., I thought it was more than just a cute kid. This wasn’t just another animated GIF maker: It was a cel-based tool that created streaming animations for the Web and multimedia, and it was fairly full-featured for such a young product.

Several months later, at the January 1997 Macworld Expo, I was searching for the FutureWave booth. I found it – finally – hidden away in the budget booth section of San Francisco’s Moscone Center. Twenty-four hours later, it was gone, and so was FutureWave. The company’s executives reappeared in the giant Macromedia Inc. (more…)